Off Press Podcast

Episode 38 • November 5, 2020

U.S. Rep. Karen Bass On Election Results

With votes nearly tallied, U.S. Rep. Karen Bass, chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, describes changes she expects in a possible Biden presidency and a new Congress.

Episode 37 • November 4, 2020

Election Special Report: Where Do We Stand?

The voting is over, and now the election is about counting, counting and counting. Justin Levitt, election law expert at LMU Loyola Law School, and Michael Genovese, LMU expert on the presidency, discuss the state of the 2020 election and...

Episode 36 • October 28, 2020

Sean Dempsey, S.J., on the 2020 Catholic Vote

Catholic voters, whose ballots were crucial in 2016, may sway the 2020 presidential election. But, says Prof. Sean Dempsey, S.J., the days when Catholics voted as a bloc are long gone. Today, they span the political spectrum, and to think...

Episode 35 • October 23, 2020

Chaya Crowder on Black Voters and U.S. Elections

“The Republican Party has made little to no attempt to historically appeal to Black voters since the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act,” says Prof. Chaya Crowder in describing why Black voters, especially Black women, are the backbone of...

Episode 34 • October 16, 2020

Stefan Bradley on Black Americans and the 2020 Election

With the Biden-Trump presidential battle threatening to sweep most national issues from the nation’s radar, Prof. Stefan Bradley discusses what he sees at stake for Black Americans in the 2020 election.

Episode 33 • October 7, 2020

Carol Costello on White House Virus and Incivility

As Election Day approaches, the White House turns into a virus hot zone and political incivility deepens. Carol Costello, former CNN anchor, discusses America’s diseases of body and spirit — and what she’s doing about them.

Episode 32 • October 1, 2020

Allan Ides and the SCOTUS Nominee

If Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed as a Supreme Court justice, her impact may be shaped by her relationship with Chief Justice John Roberts, says Allan Ides, LMU Loyola Law School professor. Ides, who clerked for Justice Byron White, shares...

Episode 31 • September 24, 2020

Justin Levitt and Election 2020

Justin Levitt, constitutional law professor at the LMU Loyola Law School, may be one of the few experts on U.S. voting laws and rights who does not foresee an electoral apocalypse on Election Day, Nov. 3.

Episode 30 • September 2, 2020

Michael Genovese

Prof. Michael Genovese, a leading expert on the presidency, discusses the upcoming presidential election, which will present voters with a stark choice and promises to be as unpredictable as it will be momentous.

Episode 29 • June 16, 2020

Sean Kennedy ’86, LLS ’89

In May, an LMU Loyola Law School suit was rejected that would have forced the release of more juveniles in detention who are at risk for the coronavirus. Sean Kennedy, director of the LLS Center for Juvenile Law and Policy,...

Episode 28 • June 11, 2020

Sung Won Sohn

The rapid, global onset of the coronavirus pandemic slammed economies around the world. Sung Won Sohn, LMU professor of finance and economics, discusses signs of hope in a stark U.S. and California economic forecast.

Episode 27 • May 29, 2020

Tom Plate

U.S. relations with China — from the COVID-19 crisis to democracy protests in Hong Kong — may shape the November 2020 presidential election. Tom Plate, LMU professor and Asia expert, talks about foreign policy disputes and pragmatism in dealing with...

Episode 26 • May 28, 2020

Fernando Guerra and Brianne Gilbert

When the Leavey Center for the Study of Los Angeles surveyed L.A. residents this spring about Mayor Eric Garcetti’s leadership in the COVID-19 crisis, the center documented overwhelming support across the board.

Episode 25 • May 14, 2020

Shira Shafir ’99

The coronavirus has caused more than 80,000 deaths in the United States in just four months. Shira Shafir ’99, professor of epidemiology, warns that as in the 1918–19 influenza epidemic a second wave of infections in the COVID-19 crisis could...

Episode 24 • May 1, 2020

David Offenberg

The COVID-19 shutdown has slammed the film industry, causing delayed movie releases, closed theaters and widespread unemployment for workers. David Offenberg, an expert in entertainment finance, describes the devastating impact on financing, creation, production and employment in a crucial L.A....

Episode 23 • April 7, 2020

Chilembwe Mason ’98, M.D.

The COVID-19 crisis is now straining health services in several U.S. regions. In the third of our series on the pandemic, Chilembwe Mason, M.D., who is an emergency medicine physician in Bronx, New York, describes the overwhelming needs he is...

Episode 22 • April 2, 2020

Stan Johnson

“I don’t want to be anywhere where there’s no pressure,” says Stan Johnson, new head coach of the LMU men’s basketball team. “That’s not fun; pressure is a privilege.” Johnson talks about the recruiting challenge during the COVID-19 crisis, when...

Episode 21 • March 30, 2020

Thomas V. Cunningham

The COVID-19 crisis is already straining health services in several U.S. regions. In the second of our series on the pandemic, Thomas V. Cunningham, a bioethics director with Kaiser Permanente and lecturer with the LMU Bioethics Institute, describes the impact...

Episode 20 • March 25, 2020

Kate Pickert

COVID-19, a global pandemic, has created a U.S. health policy crisis. Kate Pickert, who covered healthcare as a reporter, talks about the impact of a lagging governmental response on the medical community and health agencies.

Episode 19 • February 17, 2020

Paul Westhead

Paul Westhead’s innovative basketball philosophy, known as “The System,” produced one of the most high octane teams seen in college basketball and an unforgettable run to the NCAA tournament Elite Eight. Westhead talks about his strategy and his players —...

Episode 18 • December 19, 2019

Judy Woodruff

Judy Woodruff, PBS NewsHour anchor, discusses the debate moderator’s role in one of the most visible stages in a presidential election process. It’s part of our special Off Press podcast series focused on the Democratic Presidential Candidates Debate at LMU.

Episode 17 • December 17, 2019

Tony Coelho ’64

Tony Coelho, who ran the 2000 Gore Democratic presidential campaign, says don’t underestimate approachability when it comes to the voters’ choice for president. It’s part of our special Off Press podcast series on the Democratic Presidential Candidates Debate at LMU...

Episode 16 • December 16, 2019

Tom Perez

Tom Perez, chair of the Democratic National Committee, says the 2020 election will be a moral fork in the road for the United States. His interview is the fourth in our six-part Off Press podcast series on the Democratic Presidential...

Episode 15 • December 13, 2019

Tia Carr ’21 and Olin Osborne ’23

Young voters may determine the 2020 presidential election. Tia Carr and Olin Osborne, LMU international relations majors, describe what they expect from presidential candidates and what they believe candidates offer. It’s the third in our six-part Off Press podcast series...

Episode 14 • December 12, 2019

Michael Genovese

Prof. Michael Genovese, a leading expert on the presidency, looks at the Democratic presidential candidates and talks about the party’s need to offer a compelling alternative to President Trump if it hopes to win the 2020 presidential election. It’s the...

Episode 13 • December 11, 2019

Richard Fox

Prof. Richard Fox, an expert on U.S. elections, discusses the Democratic primary race and which contenders have the best chance to defeat President Donald Trump in 2020. It’s the first in our six-part Off Press podcast series on the Democratic...

Episode 12 • September 17, 2019

Elizabeth Drummond

In recent western history, hate has seemed to fuel political movements and conflicts around the world from the Nazi Holocaust to the Rwandan genocide of Tutsi people. Elizabeth Drummond, professor of modern European history at LMU, talks about the ways...

Episode 11 • August 1, 2019

Lynell George ’84

Los Angeles is a rare city with a significance in America that is equally powerful as both myth and reality. Writer Lynell George ’84, who is native to this place, has spent years exploring L.A. and its meaning. Here she...

Episode 10 • June 17, 2019

Richard Fox

With 23 candidates, the Democrats’ presidential primary process looks like a dinner party with too many guests. Richard Fox, LMU professor of political science who specializes in U.S. elections, discusses the fight for money, contenders’ motivations and how President Trump...

Episode 9 • November 13, 2018

Evelyn McDonnell

Without women, the sound and substance of today’s rock and pop music would be unimaginable. Evelyn McDonnell, director of the LMU journalism program and editor of “Women Who Rock,” discusses female artists who have confronted and overcome glass ceilings, limited...

Episode 8 • November 1, 2018

Justin Levitt

Gerrymandering, it has been said, creates elections in which politicians choose their voters instead of voters choosing their representatives. Justin Levitt, a constitutional law expert at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, tracks gerrymandering around the country. He explains a...

Episode 7 • September 24, 2018

Carlos Soto ’16

Carlos Soto ’16 started his tequila company, Nosotros, as an undergraduate. Since then, he’s mastered everything from recipe to production, bottling, international sales and delivery. He’s even faced rocky U.S.-Mexico trade relations. Listen to our podcast to hear Soto talk...

Episode 6 • March 12, 2018

Garrett Snyder ’09

Los Angeles is considered one of the most ethnically diverse U.S. cities, and its culinary culture is just as wide-ranging. As food editor of Los Angeles Magazine, Garrett Snyder ’09 probably has tasted as many dishes as a United Nations...

Episode 5 • February 26, 2018

Demian Willette

The fish you order at your favorite seafood restaurant may not be the fish you get. Demian Willette, LMU biology professor, studies species substitution — the substitution of one fish for another. Using Environmental DNA testing, he hopes to improve...

Episode 4 • February 2, 2018

Helen and Robert Singleton

In July 1961, Robert Singleton, retired LMU professor of economics, and Helen Singleton M.A. ’85 joined the Freedom Rides and boarded a train from New Orleans to Jackson, Mississippi, in defiance of state segregation laws in the South. The Singletons...

Episode 3 • November 13, 2017

Elias Wondimu

After being exiled from Ethiopia, his homeland, Elias Wondimu turned to producing books about his country’s history. Today, Wondimu is publisher of LMU’s Marymount Institute Press and Tsehai Publishers. He talks about his life in Ethiopia and in exile, as...

Episode 2 • September 29, 2017

Chris Dufresne

Don Klosterman ’52 set NCAA records as a Loyola quarterback and found greater success as general manager of the Los Angeles Rams and Express (USFL). Former L.A. Times sportswriter Chris Dufresne, who covered and knew Klosterman, talks about a man...

Episode 1 • June 28, 2017

Lisa See ’79

Lisa See is the author of 10 novels and a nonfiction book that explore Chinese and Chinese-American experiences in the United States. See talks about her new novel, “The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane,” her family’s roots in L.A.’s Chinatown,...